nmrosario:

timaclaren:

nmrosario:

X-Men #47 (1968)
Humans in the Marvel Universe haven’t always been portrayed as instinctively hating mutants or the X-Men.  In fact some of them seem to be big fans here as Beast fights the Maha Yogi.

nmrosario
In some of the very first issues of X-Men, the team was looked at as pop icons like the Beetles. But that changed pretty quick from what I remember. Still, the image of teenage girls trying to pull Warren out of the sky so they could just touch his wings is burned into my brain. Glad someone is pointing this fact out. Not every human would be against the mutants.

Yeah, back in the 60s, I think Peter Parker was more distrusted by the average person than the X-Men were.  Sure, there was the angry mob in X-Men #8, but the way the X-Men reacted to that implied that it was a rare occurence.  Also, if you watch how that all played out, Hank and Bobby’s attempt to protect their secret identities from the crowd did just as much to exacerbate the situation as the fact that they were mutants.  
Of course, there was also Bolivar and Larry Trask, who created the first two generations of Sentinels; but those guys were depicted as slightly unhinged individuals who didn’t necessarily speak for the majority of humans and learned the error of their ways by the end of their respective story arcs.
Nowadays, the whole “mutants are different and humans hate anything that is different” thing has become so one-dimensional, heavyhanded and even preachy at times, that it actually makes the X-Men themselves less interesting characters, IMHO.  Because if the threats that they are facing don’t feel genuine, then it’s hard to become emotionally invested in their struggles.
I do give a lot of credit to Brian Michael Bendis for portraying the humans in his X-Men books in a much more balanced light.  He’s even had humans staging pro-mutant rallies, which is something that I think definitely would happen in the real world.  Hopefully, other writers will start to pick up on that idea.
Sorry I’m a bit long-winded here, but you can see that I have a lot to say on this subject. :)

I think it would definitely help if we started to see similar concepts in the media portrayals of the characters. A general swing of admiration turning to fear and the fear into understanding. Obviously with the way the world is today, you can still see prejudice and condemnation, so it IS a thing…but the portrayal could use some work.As I recall, the fear started when the population increased rapidly. After Scarlet Witch stripped the mutant populace of their powers we saw an upswing of pro-mutant support. But I haven’t kept up with the comics as much as I used to, alas.

nmrosario:

timaclaren:

nmrosario:

X-Men #47 (1968)

Humans in the Marvel Universe haven’t always been portrayed as instinctively hating mutants or the X-Men.  In fact some of them seem to be big fans here as Beast fights the Maha Yogi.

nmrosario
In some of the very first issues of X-Men, the team was looked at as pop icons like the Beetles. But that changed pretty quick from what I remember. Still, the image of teenage girls trying to pull Warren out of the sky so they could just touch his wings is burned into my brain. Glad someone is pointing this fact out. Not every human would be against the mutants.

Yeah, back in the 60s, I think Peter Parker was more distrusted by the average person than the X-Men were.  Sure, there was the angry mob in X-Men #8, but the way the X-Men reacted to that implied that it was a rare occurence.  Also, if you watch how that all played out, Hank and Bobby’s attempt to protect their secret identities from the crowd did just as much to exacerbate the situation as the fact that they were mutants.  

Of course, there was also Bolivar and Larry Trask, who created the first two generations of Sentinels; but those guys were depicted as slightly unhinged individuals who didn’t necessarily speak for the majority of humans and learned the error of their ways by the end of their respective story arcs.

Nowadays, the whole “mutants are different and humans hate anything that is different” thing has become so one-dimensional, heavyhanded and even preachy at times, that it actually makes the X-Men themselves less interesting characters, IMHO.  Because if the threats that they are facing don’t feel genuine, then it’s hard to become emotionally invested in their struggles.

I do give a lot of credit to Brian Michael Bendis for portraying the humans in his X-Men books in a much more balanced light.  He’s even had humans staging pro-mutant rallies, which is something that I think definitely would happen in the real world.  Hopefully, other writers will start to pick up on that idea.

Sorry I’m a bit long-winded here, but you can see that I have a lot to say on this subject. :)

I think it would definitely help if we started to see similar concepts in the media portrayals of the characters. A general swing of admiration turning to fear and the fear into understanding. Obviously with the way the world is today, you can still see prejudice and condemnation, so it IS a thing…but the portrayal could use some work.

As I recall, the fear started when the population increased rapidly. After Scarlet Witch stripped the mutant populace of their powers we saw an upswing of pro-mutant support. But I haven’t kept up with the comics as much as I used to, alas.

nmrosario:

X-Men #47 (1968)
Humans in the Marvel Universe haven’t always been portrayed as instinctively hating mutants or the X-Men.  In fact some of them seem to be big fans here as Beast fights the Maha Yogi.

nmrosario In some of the very first issues of X-Men, the team was looked at as pop icons like the Beetles. But that changed pretty quick from what I remember. Still, the image of teenage girls trying to pull Warren out of the sky so they could just touch his wings is burned into my brain. Glad someone is pointing this fact out. Not every human would be against the mutants.

nmrosario:

X-Men #47 (1968)

Humans in the Marvel Universe haven’t always been portrayed as instinctively hating mutants or the X-Men.  In fact some of them seem to be big fans here as Beast fights the Maha Yogi.

nmrosario In some of the very first issues of X-Men, the team was looked at as pop icons like the Beetles. But that changed pretty quick from what I remember. Still, the image of teenage girls trying to pull Warren out of the sky so they could just touch his wings is burned into my brain. Glad someone is pointing this fact out. Not every human would be against the mutants.
asker

Anonymous asked: Isn't it about time for Cyclops and Rogue to hook up?

kristaferanka:

brianmichaelbendis:

I believe this is the first time Brian has used my art as a response, so I’m gonna call this a good day

brianmichaelbendis:

Jean Grey by Bruce Timm

I love Jean….

brianmichaelbendis:

Jean Grey by Bruce Timm

I love Jean….

(via projectrooftop)

khealywu:

thecostumetrailer:

"The most difficult thing I had to achieve in this film was creating the fabric for the Captain America Stealth Suit.  The Russos were very specific that they wanted a suit that was made of textured, woven, hard fabric like a Kevlar and not a printed stretch suit like you see over and over again in these films. But in reality it needed to be made of a stretch fabric that would allow movement and comfort, as well as the ability to be constructed into a more realistic military type trouser and protective top. I went through many incarnations of printed textures on stretch which then posed a whole new set of challenges and problems.  The HD cameras made raised textures strobe or moiré.  So finding the right one became a trial.  Then the printing ink would shine like plastic, which I disliked.  It took four months of research and development to create a texture that seems so simple and was yet, so complicated.” - Judianna Makovsky


In love it when people care about things.

Lost this stuff! This is how Batman’s costume should have been thought through.

khealywu:

thecostumetrailer:

"The most difficult thing I had to achieve in this film was creating the fabric for the Captain America Stealth Suit.  The Russos were very specific that they wanted a suit that was made of textured, woven, hard fabric like a Kevlar and not a printed stretch suit like you see over and over again in these films. But in reality it needed to be made of a stretch fabric that would allow movement and comfort, as well as the ability to be constructed into a more realistic military type trouser and protective top. I went through many incarnations of printed textures on stretch which then posed a whole new set of challenges and problems.  The HD cameras made raised textures strobe or moiré.  So finding the right one became a trial.  Then the printing ink would shine like plastic, which I disliked.  It took four months of research and development to create a texture that seems so simple and was yet, so complicated.” - Judianna Makovsky

In love it when people care about things.

Lost this stuff! This is how Batman’s costume should have been thought through.

(via projectrooftop)

"Ray Stantz everyone! The heart of the Ghostbusters!" #ghostbusters #gb30

"Ray Stantz everyone! The heart of the Ghostbusters!" #ghostbusters #gb30

That feeling you get when you know EVERYTHING! Guess what I’m working on… #sox #xmen #fanfiction

That feeling you get when you know EVERYTHING! Guess what I’m working on… #sox #xmen #fanfiction

perooooo:

NOOOOOOoooooooooooo…


Um…yeah….story of my life…

perooooo:

NOOOOOOoooooooooooo…

Um…yeah….story of my life…

(via thelittlestbat)

Getting closer….#sketches #wip #hellhawg #a10 #oef

Getting closer….#sketches #wip #hellhawg #a10 #oef

Oh the things I can do! #patch #a10 #warthog #hellhawgs

Oh the things I can do! #patch #a10 #warthog #hellhawgs